#nasagoddard

9.801K Posts

4 hours ago

Our 7th (!) "space mission patch" for @creativeactionnetwork's #spacehorizons campaign is TESS - @NASAgoddard's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. It will look for exoplanets for two years, using the transit method where the instruments record a drop in a star's brightness when a planet passes in front of it. Our design shows a stylised planet transit across the disk of a star, and the corresponding dip in measured brightness. It will be launched on @spacex's Falcon 9 rocket in April. Read more below and get the art print from CAN website www.creativeaction.network. Link in bio. @Creativeactionnetwork has invited artists and designers to (re)imagine patches for space missions past, present and future. Proceeds support #SpaceHorizons, a non profit promoting STEM education for minority and female students. TESS - NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will be scanning for new planets outside of our solar system, ranging from Earth-sized ones to gas giants, monitoring 200 000 stars during a two year mission. When a planet passes in front of its star there's a small dip in the star's measured brightness, which the spacecraft will detect. TESS is scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 rocket in April 2018. This reimagined "mission patch" shows a stylised planetary transit in front a star disk, and the corresponding measured dip in light intensity. I have been intrigued by astrobiology since I took a course in the subject at Lund University in 2003. Since then a lot has happened in the field. Finding new exoplanets means finding new possible worlds that could harbour life. #TESS #cassini #NASA #Spacemissionpatch #saturn #spaceflight #spaceprobe #satellite #scicomm #spaceart #spaceillustration #ScienceIllustration #STEM #STEAM.

a day ago

This Cassini image shows Jupiter from an unusual perspective. If you were to float just beneath the giant planet and look directly up, you would be greeted with this striking sight: Jupiter's South Pole!👌🏻 | Credits: @nasagoddard ————————————————————————————— Follow @muskyspace for more! 🌌 ————————————————————————————— #science #space #nasa #muskyspace

3 days ago

Duas galáxias se fundem a 250 milhões de anos-luz, num movimento espiral. Imagem do telescópio Hubble via @nasagoddard 💫💜💥 #grampogaláctica

4 days ago

Excerpt from Chapter V: Talking to Dolphin // Book: TelemetrySky @harborbranch #harborbranch - Immeasurable Heavens deep in our heart. A galactic collision, mapping Time of Flight in the night In a beautiful gravitational dance through heaven. @patrickwtoole ———————— #heliophysics #nasahq Thank you K. Fox for the line above, ‘Time of Flight’————————————————————- At NASA Goddard, in Richard Stolarski’s paper, History of the study of Atmospheric Ozone. He cited a quote circa 1873: ‘To the Philosopher, the Physician, the Meteorologist, and the Chemist, there is perhaps no subject more attractive than that of ozone.’ - It is remarkable that the debate still rages. We have a #Satellite (ICESAT2) heading into space this year to measure how thick polar ice truly is. Currently, we have no clue. The data may help us take a step forward in our ability to understand our ozone layer and it’s influence on our oceans, climate, and ice. It’s not a matter of change, but rather how humans adapt. @nasa #nasagoddard #icesat2 ———————————————————————————— #poem #poetry #poetrycommunity #writersofinstagram #writerscommunity #spilledink #wordporn #rubinreport #dolphins #wilddolphins #artist #philosopher #carljung @jordan.b.peterson @carljung_ @car.zed @tammytate07 @matt_teague43 #plato #isaiahberlin #dostoyevsky #boatlife #verobeach #floridalife #nature #floridagirl #marinebiology #romans828 #jaakpanksepp

5 days ago

This image from @ESA/ @NASAHubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5. The large galaxy at the center is the brightest galaxy in the cluster, and above it a thin, curved gravitational lens arc is visible. This arc is caused by the gravitational forces of the cluster bending the path of light from stars and galaxies behind it, in a similar way to how a glass lens bends light. Several stars are visible in front of the cluster — recognizable by their diffraction spikes — but aside from these, all other visible objects are distant galaxies. Their light has become redshifted by the expansion of space, making them appear redder than they actually are. By measuring the amount of redshift, we know that it took more than 5 billion years for the light from this galaxy cluster to reach us. The light of the galaxies in the background had to travel even longer than that, making this image an extremely old window into the far reaches of the universe. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS; Acknowledgement: D. Coe et al. #nasagoddard #space #science #timetravel #future #futurism #streaming #scifi #scifiworld #scififilm #scifimovie #sciencefiction #science #netflix #robot #fantasy #digitalart #amazing #StarTrekDiscovery #space #spacex #retro #geek #nerd #neon #syfy #iss #nasa #startrek #starwars

6 days ago

#repost @nasagoddard This image from @ESA/ @NASAHubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5. The large galaxy at the center is the brightest galaxy in the cluster, and above it a thin, curved gravitational lens arc is visible. This arc is caused by the gravitational forces of the cluster bending the path of light from stars and galaxies behind it, in a similar way to how a glass lens bends light. Several stars are visible in front of the cluster — recognizable by their diffraction spikes — but aside from these, all other visible objects are distant galaxies. Their light has become redshifted by the expansion of space, making them appear redder than they actually are. By measuring the amount of redshift, we know that it took more than 5 billion years for the light from this galaxy cluster to reach us. The light of the galaxies in the background had to travel even longer than that, making this image an extremely old window into the far reaches of the universe. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS; Acknowledgement: D. Coe et al. #nasagoddard #space #science

6 days ago

This image from @ESA/ @NASAHubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5. The large galaxy at the center is the brightest galaxy in the cluster, and above it a thin, curved gravitational lens arc is visible. This arc is caused by the gravitational forces of the cluster bending the path of light from stars and galaxies behind it, in a similar way to how a glass lens bends light. Several stars are visible in front of the cluster — recognizable by their diffraction spikes — but aside from these, all other visible objects are distant galaxies. Their light has become redshifted by the expansion of space, making them appear redder than they actually are. By measuring the amount of redshift, we know that it took more than 5 billion years for the light from this galaxy cluster to reach us. The light of the galaxies in the background had to travel even longer than that, making this image an extremely old window into the far reaches of the universe. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS; Acknowledgement: D. Coe et al. #nasagoddard #space #science

a week ago

NASA’s next planet-hunting mission has arrived in Florida to begin preparations for launch. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is scheduled to launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station nearby NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida no earlier than April 16, pending range approval. TESS was delivered Feb. 12 aboard a truck from Orbital ATK in Dulles, Virginia, where it spent 2017 being assembled and tested. Over the next month, the spacecraft will be prepped for launch at Kennedy’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF). TESS is the next step in NASA’s search for planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets. The mission will scan nearly the entire sky to monitor more than 200,000 of the nearest and brightest stars in search of transit events — periodic dips in a star’s brightness caused by planets passing in front of their stars. TESS is expected to find thousands of exoplanets. The upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled for launch in 2019, will provide important follow-up observations of some of the most promising TESS-discovered exoplanets, allowing scientists to study their atmospheres and, in some special cases, to search for signs that these planets could support life. TESS is a NASA Astrophysics Explorer mission led and operated by MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Dr. George Ricker of MIT’s Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research serves as principal investigator for the mission. Additional partners include Orbital ATK, NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the Space Telescope Science Institute. More than a dozen universities, research institutes and observatories worldwide are participants in the mission. NASA’s Launch Services Program is responsible for launch management. SpaceX of Hawthorne, California, is the provider of the Falcon 9 launch service. Banner image: NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS),Credit: @nasa #nasagoddard #mit #spacex

a week ago

@Regranned from @nasagoddard - A Black Brant IX sounding rocket launched from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska Jan. 19, carrying a mission to measure diffuse X-rays from the local galactic neighborhood. The flight was a success, and the science team is reviewing data. Credit: NASA/Allison Stancil #nasagoddard #science #space #alaska - #regrann

a week ago

@Regranned from @nasagoddard - Roughly 50 million light-years away lies a somewhat overlooked little galaxy named NGC 1559. Pictured here by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, this barred spiral lies in the little-observed southern constellation of Reticulum (the Reticule). . NGC 1559 has massive spiral arms chock-full of star formation, and is receding from us at a speed of about 808 miles per second (1,300 kilometers per second). The galaxy contains the mass of around ten billion suns — while this may sound like a lot, it is over 20 times less massive than the Milky Way. Although NGC 1559 appears in the sky near one of our closest galaxy neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), this is just a trick of perspective. In reality, NGC 1559 is physically nowhere near the LMC in space — in fact, it truly is a loner, lacking the company of any nearby galaxies or membership of any galaxy cluster. . Despite its lack of cosmic companions, when this lonely galaxy has a telescope pointed in its direction, it puts on quite a show. NGC 1559 has hosted a variety of spectacular exploding stars called supernovae, four of which we have observed — in 1984, 1986, 2005, and 2009. . NGC 1559 may be alone in space, but we are watching and admiring from far away. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy #stars #star - #regrann

a week ago

#universo #Rensta #Repost: @nasagoddard via @renstapp ··· “ Hubble takes an epic dive into an enormous bubble blown into space by a super-hot, massive star! For the 26th birthday of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers are highlighting a Hubble image of an enormous bubble being blown into space by a super-hot, massive star. The Hubble image of the Bubble Nebula, or NGC 7635, was chosen to mark the 26th anniversary of the launch of Hubble into Earth orbit by the STS-31 space shuttle crew on April 24, 1990. The Bubble Nebula is seven light-years across—about one-and-a-half times the distance from our sun to its nearest stellar neighbor, Alpha Centauri, and resides 7,100 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cassiopeia. The seething star forming this nebula is 45 times more massive than our sun. Gas on the star gets so hot that it escapes away into space as a “stellar wind” moving at over four million miles per hour. This outflow sweeps up the cold, interstellar gas in front of it, forming the outer edge of the bubble much like a snowplow piles up snow in front of it as it moves forward. As the surface of the bubble's shell expands outward, it slams into dense regions of cold gas on one side of the bubble. This asymmetry makes the star appear dramatically off-center from the bubble, with its location in the 10 o’clock position in the Hubble view. Dense pillars of cool hydrogen gas laced with dust appear at the upper left of the picture, and more “fingers” can be seen nearly face-on, behind the translucent bubble. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) #epic #nasagoddard #Hubble #space

a week ago

Communications, propulsion, earth observation. . From the Network Integration Center they communicate with Astronauts and Spacecraft, and look to new laser communication systems, from Rocket City the NASA administrator gives the run down of the new budget via a wicked camera angle through a vintage rocket engine and Chief Scientist, Jim Garvin holds a rapt audience talking about earth observation satellites. 🚀🛰🚀🛰🚀🛰🚀🌞🌖🌍☄️💫🛫🚫🌪🚙 #NASAsocial #nasagoddard #nasagoddardspaceflightcenter #hyperwall #datavisualization #science #mars #atomosphere #solarwind #video #datavisualization

a week ago

Parenting advice of the day. . Jim Garvin, Chief Scientist at @nasagoddard reminded us no matter if you are grossed out by biology or intimidated by math there is still a place for you in science if you want it. But, I’d also like to imagine he actually made his kids tear up there artwork into tiny pieces and put it back together... in preparation for reconstructing the history of Mar’s atmosphere. . #NASAsocial #nasagoddard #nasagoddardspaceflightcenter #hyperwall #datavisualization #science #mars #atomosphere #solarwind #video #datavisualization #stateofnasa

2 weeks ago

📷 credit @nasagoddard ------ A Black Brant IX sounding rocket launched from the Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska Jan. 19, carrying a mission to measure diffuse X-rays from the local galactic neighborhood. The flight was a success, and the science team is reviewing data. Credit: NASA/Allison Stancil #nasagoddard #science #space #alaska

2 weeks ago

💙 #Repost @nasagoddard ( @get_repost) ・・・ Roughly 50 million light-years away lies a somewhat overlooked little galaxy named NGC 1559. Pictured here by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, this barred spiral lies in the little-observed southern constellation of Reticulum (the Reticule). . NGC 1559 has massive spiral arms chock-full of star formation, and is receding from us at a speed of about 808 miles per second (1,300 kilometers per second). The galaxy contains the mass of around ten billion suns — while this may sound like a lot, it is over 20 times less massive than the Milky Way. Although NGC 1559 appears in the sky near one of our closest galaxy neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), this is just a trick of perspective. In reality, NGC 1559 is physically nowhere near the LMC in space — in fact, it truly is a loner, lacking the company of any nearby galaxies or membership of any galaxy cluster. . Despite its lack of cosmic companions, when this lonely galaxy has a telescope pointed in its direction, it puts on quite a show. NGC 1559 has hosted a variety of spectacular exploding stars called supernovae, four of which we have observed — in 1984, 1986, 2005, and 2009. . NGC 1559 may be alone in space, but we are watching and admiring from far away. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy #stars #star

2 weeks ago

🤓🌴🚀

2 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Roughly 50 million light-years away lies a somewhat overlooked little galaxy named NGC 1559. Pictured here by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, this barred spiral lies in the little-observed southern constellation of Reticulum (the Reticule). . NGC 1559 has massive spiral arms chock-full of star formation, and is receding from us at a speed of about 808 miles per second (1,300 kilometers per second). The galaxy contains the mass of around ten billion suns — while this may sound like a lot, it is over 20 times less massive than the Milky Way. Although NGC 1559 appears in the sky near one of our closest galaxy neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), this is just a trick of perspective. In reality, NGC 1559 is physically nowhere near the LMC in space — in fact, it truly is a loner, lacking the company of any nearby galaxies or membership of any galaxy cluster. . Despite its lack of cosmic companions, when this lonely galaxy has a telescope pointed in its direction, it puts on quite a show. NGC 1559 has hosted a variety of spectacular exploding stars called supernovae, four of which we have observed — in 1984, 1986, 2005, and 2009. . NGC 1559 may be alone in space, but we are watching and admiring from far away. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy #stars #star

2 weeks ago

Roughly 50 million light-years away lies a somewhat overlooked little galaxy named NGC 1559. Pictured here by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, this barred spiral lies in the little-observed southern constellation of Reticulum (the Reticule). . NGC 1559 has massive spiral arms chock-full of star formation, and is receding from us at a speed of about 808 miles per second (1,300 kilometers per second). The galaxy contains the mass of around ten billion suns — while this may sound like a lot, it is over 20 times less massive than the Milky Way. Although NGC 1559 appears in the sky near one of our closest galaxy neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), this is just a trick of perspective. In reality, NGC 1559 is physically nowhere near the LMC in space — in fact, it truly is a loner, lacking the company of any nearby galaxies or membership of any galaxy cluster. . Despite its lack of cosmic companions, when this lonely galaxy has a telescope pointed in its direction, it puts on quite a show. NGC 1559 has hosted a variety of spectacular exploding stars called supernovae, four of which we have observed — in 1984, 1986, 2005, and 2009. . NGC 1559 may be alone in space, but we are watching and admiring from far away. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy #stars #star

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Hubble's Celestial Snow Globe ❄️🛰️🌠 . It’s beginning to look a lot like the holiday season in this @NASAHubble image of a blizzard of stars, which resembles a swirling snowstorm in a snow globe. . The stars are residents of the globular star cluster Messier 79, or M79, located 41,000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Lepus. The cluster is also known as NGC 1904. Globular clusters are gravitationally bound groupings of as many as 1 million stars. M79 contains about 150,000 stars packed into an area measuring only 118 light-years across. These giant “star-globes” contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, estimated to be 11.7 billion years old. . This video starts with a wide-field view of the sky covering the constellations of Orion, the hunter, and Lepus, the hare. The view zooms down to the relatively tiny field of the Hubble image of globular star cluster Messier 79 (M79). The sequence then dissolves to a visualization of a rotating star cluster that provides three-dimensional perspective. The simulated star cluster is modeled to reflect the number, color, and distribution of stars in M79, but not its exact structure. Finally, the scene pulls back to reveal a special holiday greeting. . In the Hubble image, Sun-like stars appear yellow. The reddish stars are bright giants that represent the final stages of a star’s life. Most of the blue stars sprinkled throughout the cluster are aging “helium-burning” stars. These bright blue stars have exhausted their hydrogen fuel and are now fusing helium in their cores. . A scattering of fainter blue stars are “blue stragglers.” These unusual stars glow in blue light, mimicking the appearance of hot, young stars. Blue stragglers form either by the merger of stars in a binary system or by the collision of two unrelated stars in M79’s crowded core. . Credit: NASA and ESA, Acknowledgment: S. Djorgovski (Caltech) and F. Ferraro (University of Bologna) #nasagoddard #space #gaalaxy #star

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Next time you are 45 million light-years away in the neighboorhood of the constellation of Pegasus you might want to keep an eye out for this spectacular spiral galaxy. This @nasahubble image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN 2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between this galaxy and our own is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disk itself. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University) #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Amazing view from space shows the #BombCyclone as this powerful winter nor'easter was moving toward New England on Jan. 4, 2018. NOAA's GOES-East satellite provides infrared and visible data of the eastern half of the U.S. In a visible image taken Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST) from NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite, known as GOES East showed the center of the low pressure area off the coast of the northeastern U.S. and a thick band of clouds bringing snow and gusty winds from the Mid-Atlantic states to New England. The National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Prediction Center noted "a strengthening Nor'easter will bring snow and gusty winds, with blizzard conditions along the coast and blowing snow elsewhere, along the Middle Atlantic and Northeast through Thursday. Minor to major coastal flooding and erosion will be possible, especially during high tides. Dangerous travel, scattered power outages, and bitter wind chill can be expected across the entire east coast." Image caption: This visible image of the U.S. was captured from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST). For updated forecasts, visit the NWS website: www.weather.gov #nasagoddard #weather #science #bombcyclone #snow

3 weeks ago

#Repost @nasagoddard with @get_repost ・・・ Next time you are 45 million light-years away in the neighboorhood of the constellation of Pegasus you might want to keep an eye out for this spectacular spiral galaxy. This @nasahubble image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image using Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star — a supernova — near the galaxy’s central yellow core. Named SN 2014C, it rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars. NGC 7331 is similar in size, shape and mass to the Milky Way. It also has a comparable star formation rate, hosts a similar number of stars, has a central supermassive black hole and comparable spiral arms. The primary difference between this galaxy and our own is that NGC 7331 is an unbarred spiral galaxy — it lacks a “bar” of stars, gas and dust cutting through its nucleus, as we see in the Milky Way. Its central bulge also displays a quirky and unusual rotation pattern, spinning in the opposite direction to the galactic disk itself. By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University) #nasagoddard #space #science #galaxy

3 weeks ago

#Repost @nasagoddard ・・・ Hubble released a set of celestial objects that were all the rage in the 1800's, thanks to astronomer Charles Messier — In a nod to the global amateur #astronomy community, as well as to any space enthusiast who enjoys the beauty of the cosmos, the Hubble Space Telescope mission is releasing its version of the popular Messier catalog, featuring some of Hubble’s best images of these celestial objects that were once noted for looking like comets but turned out not to be. This release coincides with the Orionid meteor shower — a spectacle that occurs each year when Earth flies through a debris field left behind by Halley’s Comet when it last visited the inner solar system in 1986. The shower will peak during the pre-dawn hours this Saturday, Oct. 21. credit: @NASAHubble #nasagoddard #Hubble #space #science

3 weeks ago

This is work in progress of the Horsehead Nebula in Ha (hydrogen-alpha). Also visible in this photo are Alnitak (the bright star at the left) and the Flame Nebula which are part of the vast Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The bright star Altinak is the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion (Las Tres Marías) and is a hot blue supergiant, around 33 times more massive and 20 times bigger than our sun, in a triple star system. It shines energetic ultraviolet light into The Flame knocking electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen. Much of the glow results when the electrons and ionized hydrogen recombine. Additional dark gas and dust lies in front of the bright part of the nebula appearing like a dark network in the center of the glowing gas. Similarly, the prominent horse head portion of the nebula is really just part of a larger cloud of dust and gases which is visible only because is silhouetted against another brighter nebula. #astrophotography #astrophysics #astronomy #universe #nebula #horsehead #telescope #huffingtonpost #nasahuffpost #igtakeover #nasagoddard @huffpostuk @youresa @europeanspaceagency @nasagoddard @nasajohnson @explorenasa @natgeospace @astronomicwonders @astronomypicturesdaily @astronomy45 @astro_photography_ @astropicsdaily

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Hubble's Holiday Nebula “Ornament” . @NASAHubble captured what looks like a colorful holiday ornament in space. It's actually an image of NGC 6326, a planetary nebula with glowing wisps of outpouring gas that are lit up by a central star nearing the end of its life. . When a star ages and the red giant phase of its life comes to an end, it starts to eject layers of gas from its surface leaving behind a hot and compact white dwarf. Sometimes this ejection results in elegantly symmetric patterns of glowing gas, but NGC 6326 is much less structured. This object is located in the constellation of Ara, the Altar, about 11,000 light-years from Earth. Planetary nebulae are one of the main ways in which elements heavier than hydrogen and helium are dispersed into space after their creation in the hearts of stars. Eventually some of this out-flung material may form new stars and planets. . This picture was created from images taken using the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The vivid blue and red hues come from material including ionized oxygen and hydrogen glowing under the action of the fierce ultraviolet radiation from the still hot central star. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #space #science

3 weeks ago

#Repost @nasagoddard with @get_repost ・・・ @NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Flying through the Orion nebula . By combining the visible and infrared capabilities of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, astronomers and visualization specialists from NASA’s Universe of Learning program have created a spectacular, three-dimensional, fly-through movie of the magnificent Orion nebula, a nearby stellar nursery. Using actual scientific data along with Hollywood techniques, a team at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland, and the Caltech/IPAC in Pasadena, California, has produced the best and most detailed multi-wavelength visualization yet of the Orion nebula. #nasagoddard #space #orion #nebula

3 weeks ago

@nasagoddard Hiç bi yolculuk tüylerimi bu denli uyarmadı! @NASAHubble's">#repost @NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

#Repost @nasagoddard with @get_repost ・・・ @NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

#Repost @nasagoddard @NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa #astrophysics #astronomy #nebula #orion #starformation #sky #space #hubblespacetelescope #360video

3 weeks ago

@NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

#universo #Rensta #Repost: @nasagoddard via @renstapp ··· “ At any given moment, as many as 10 million wild jets of solar material burst from the sun’s surface. They erupt as fast as 60 miles per second, and can reach lengths of 6,000 miles before collapsing. These are spicules, and despite their grass-like abundance, scientists didn’t understand how they form. Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun’s surface and surge upward so quickly. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Joy Ng, producer #nasagoddard #Sun #space #science

3 weeks ago

#FastRepost from @nasagoddard by @fastrepost_app ••• @NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

@NASAHubble's Orion Nebula - 360° Video . This visualization journeys into the famous star-forming region of the Orion Nebula based on an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. This exhilarating trip begins by flying through a layer of gas above the nebula, called the "veil." The descent to the gaseous surface provides an overview of the structure of the region as the winds and radiation from the central cluster have carved out a long "valley" in the cloud. The massive bright stars are responsible for heating the gas to temperatures at which it glows. . To view the 360° video go to: facebook.com/NASASHubble . Credits: Frank Summers, Greg Bacon, Zolt Levay, Lisa Frattare, Massimo Robberto (STScI) Acknowledgment: Robert Gendler. Music: "Blizzard (PON I)", Kai Engel, CC BY-NC #nasagoddard #space #science #nasa

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Hubble’s Barred and Booming Spiral Galaxy This image, captured by the @NASAHubble, shows a galaxy named UGC 6093. As can be easily seen, UGC 6093 is something known as a barred spiral galaxy — it has beautiful arms that swirl outwards from a bar slicing through the galaxy’s center. It is classified as an active galaxy, which means that it hosts an active galactic nucleus, or AGN: a compact region at a galaxy’s center within which material is dragged towards a supermassive black hole. As this black hole devours the surrounding matter it emits intense radiation, causing it to shine brightly. But UGC 6093 is more exotic still. The galaxy essentially acts as a giant astronomical laser that also spews out light at microwave, not visible, wavelengths — this type of object is dubbed a megamaser (maser being the term for a microwave laser). Megamasers such as UGC 6093 can be some 100 million times brighter than masers found in galaxies like the Milky Way. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasagoddard #galaxy #space #science

3 weeks ago

#repost @nasagoddard Why did astronomers nickname this enormous galaxy cluster “El Gordo” (“the Fat One” in Spanish)? . In 2014, astronomers using @NASAHubble found that this enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns — so it’s little wonder that it has earned the nickname of “El Gordo” (“the Fat One” in Spanish)! Known officially as ACT-CLJ0102-4915, it is the largest, hottest, and brightest X-ray galaxy cluster ever discovered in the distant Universe. . Galaxy clusters are the largest objects in the Universe that are bound together by gravity. They form over billions of years as smaller groups of galaxies slowly come together. In 2012, observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope showed that El Gordo is actually composed of two galaxy clusters colliding at millions of kilometers per hour. . The formation of galaxy clusters depends heavily on dark matter and dark energy; studying such clusters can therefore help shed light on these elusive phenomena. In 2014, Hubble found that most of El Gordo’s mass is concealed in the form of dark matter. Evidence suggests that El Gordo’s “normal” matter — largely composed of hot gas that is bright in the X-ray wavelength domain — is being torn from the dark matter in the collision. The hot gas is slowing down, while the dark matter is not. . This image was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide-Field Camera 3 as part of an observing program called RELICS (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey). RELICS imaged 41 massive galaxy clusters with the aim of finding the brightest distant galaxies for the forthcoming James Webb Space Telescope to study. . Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS #NASAGoddard #space #science

a month ago

Mission to Mars by #FranklynMBranley illustrated by #TrueKelly | In seeking out all the books about space I found this gem and learned it’s one in a book series called "Let's Read and Find Out Science” Are you a fan already? We are late to the party but happy to have found out about it! The Author Franklyn Branley was Astronomer Emeritus and former Chairman of the American Museum-Hayden Planeterium. In 1960, he started the Let’s–Read–and–Find–Out Science series, dedicated to explaining science to young children and encouraging them to explore their world. And he has authored over 150 books! WOW! This one is about Mars. It’s from 2002 so I’m not sure what information is dated. But even still it provides an awesome understanding of how logistically a mission like this happens. And just how complicated and COOL exploration of our neighboring planet would be. "The book is written in an appealing second-person style ("...you may become the first person to walk on Mars") with step-by-step instructions on how to reach Mars (a spaceship launched from the international space station, a habitat lander) and set up a Mars base. Sprinkled throughout are facts about space (eg, microgravity) and Mars (red dust, low gravity)." An ace book from the pile we checked out from @NYPL that is expanding our knowledge of space exploration. #Nasa #NasaGoddard #TheReadingNinja @NASAGoddard @NASA @NASASocial